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2019-06-19Zeitschriftenartikel DOI: 10.25646/5986
Social inequality and diabetes mellitus – developments over time among the adult population in Germany
dc.contributor.authorHeidemann, Christin
dc.contributor.authorDu, Yong
dc.contributor.authorBaumert, Jens
dc.contributor.authorPaprott, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorLampert, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorScheidt-Nave, Christa
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-22T06:22:21Z
dc.date.available2019-03-22T06:22:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-19none
dc.identifier.urihttp://edoc.rki.de/176904/6021
dc.description.abstractThe connection between social disadvantage and the presence of known diabetes and specific risk factors is well documented. This article summarises the results from the Robert Koch Institute examination surveys that were conducted between 1997 and 1999 as well as 2008 and 2011 to address social inequality – operationalised by level of education – with regard to prevalences of known and unknown diabetes, risk of diabetes and care of diabetes as well as their development over time. Both survey periods showed that the low education group has higher prevalences of known and unkown diabetes as well as a higher risk of developing diabetes within the next five years compared to the medium and high education group. Over time, prevalence tended to increase for known diabetes and to decrease for unknown diabetes for all education groups. For the 5-year diabetes risk, only the high education group showed a clear decrease over time. The chosen indicators of diabetes care indicated no clear differences between education groups and an improvement of diabetes care over time. For some indicators of care (foot examination, statins), improvements were only seen in the low education group. In conclusion, social inequalities in the prevalence of known and unknown diabetes as well as in diabetes risk remain in Germany; for the indicators of care, however, no clear education gradient is evident. Over time, inequality regarding the prevalence of diabetes has not increased further. However, with regard to diabetes risk, inequality has become slightly more evident. For individual care indicators, improvements are limited to specific education groups.eng
dc.language.isoengnone
dc.publisherRobert Koch-Institut
dc.rights(CC BY 3.0 DE) Namensnennung 3.0 Deutschlandger
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/
dc.subjectDIABETES MELLITUSeng
dc.subjectEDUCATION
dc.subjectPREVALENCE
dc.subjectDIABETES RISK
dc.subjectDIABETES CARE
dc.subject.ddc610 Medizin und Gesundheitnone
dc.titleSocial inequality and diabetes mellitus – developments over time among the adult population in Germanynone
dc.typearticle
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:kobv:0257-176904/6021-7
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25646/5986
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionnone
local.edoc.container-titleJournal of Health Monitoringnone
local.edoc.type-nameZeitschriftenartikel
local.edoc.container-typeperiodical
local.edoc.container-type-nameZeitschrift
local.edoc.container-urlhttps://www.rki.de/EN/Content/Health_Monitoring/JoHM_en/JoHM_en_node.htmlnone
local.edoc.container-volume4none
local.edoc.container-issue2none
local.edoc.container-reportyear2019none
local.edoc.container-periodicalpart-creatorRobert Koch-Institutnone
local.edoc.container-firstpage11none
local.edoc.container-lastpage28none
local.edoc.rki-departmentEpidemiologie und Gesundheitsmonitoringnone
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewednone

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